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Use the keywords from the title with hashtags and track their discussion on Twitter and you might be able to measure what’s being discussed in the media and entertainment industry this week.  In Las Vegas the topics are ongoing conversations.  Just check out the NAB Show Daily Report.  Ninety-thousand attendees reported and 1600 exhibitors. 

Still the discussion of social media is a small part the largest annual show for broadcasters.  Cory Bergman from Lost Remote wrote a wrap-up of how broadcast manufacturers are fulfilling the disruption in the industry.  The theme of the NAB convention is “The Great Content Shift.”  There is clearly recognition of the rumblings in what association executives are calling a transformative year for convention activities.

Susan Ashworth, from TV Technology, writes for the NAB Show Daily Report “those in the business of creating, managing and distributing content must look less at specific channels of distribution and more at every platform opportunity.”  She also wrote the daily report’s article on the second screen and the impact of smart and mobile devices on media and entertainment.  Ashworth quotes NAB execs liberally in her reports and Dennis Wharton, NAB executive vice president of communications is one.  “It’s all about taking the opportunity to monetize our content on as many platforms as possible,” he said.

Media and technology lawyers are echoing the topics.  “People have to think about looking at their business as a content business and a delivery business, and look at the way that they can profit from each one,” said Peter Tannenwald, member of the law firm Fletcher, Heald & Hildreth.  As Lost Remote’s Bergman describes it’s like almost 20-years ago when convention discussions were concerned with the Internet.  Now it’s social media.

In the report on second screens Roger Keating, senior vice president of digital media at Hearst gets quoted. 

“People enjoy our programming from within the confines of their home; we can’t see their reactions.

 But if harnessed properly, social media can change all that.  It turns every episode, every newscast into a live focus group.  We’ll know instantly the pulse of the show, the overriding sentiment; what parts draw most heat.  And that’ll make us better programmers.”

Jonathan Weitz, partner with analyst firm IBB Consulting, in the same report adds “We are also seeing networks and broadcasters working to grow their social media practices across the organization in areas like research, marketing, distribution and product development.”

Maybe it will be a conversation among broadcasters on Linkedin and comments online that will continue to drive the discussion about the great content shift in media and entertainment.  Let me fuel the dialogue with another lexeme.  Transmedia is usually paired with storytelling to explain presentation of content across platforms.  However, I’m told it’s morphed into an alias for “multiplatform distribution of media.”

James Rowe



UK Cloud Video Production Enters US

United Kingdom cloud video production service, Aframe, enters the United States market with a announcement in Boston, Massachusetts.  Online high tech journal Mass High Tech makes a big deal out of Aframe coming to Boston.

Governor of Massachusetts, Deval Patrick, made the announcement at the noted MIT Media Lab along with UK Consul General to New England Phil Budden and Minister Mark Prisk.  About week after the US festivities announcing Aframe, the three year old company’s website touted entry into the United States market as a big day for them.

CEO David Peto credits an old colleague of mine and Avid founding executive with assisting in the difficult task of a UK company breaking into the US market.  He cites Mark Overington for speeding up the process to get into the American video production business.

So what does all this mean to the producers of video?  The video attached makes some suggestions.  Aframe pricing certainly makes storage and access to video content affordable for more producers.  It’s another exciting change taking place in media and entertainment.  Check out their video explaining the revolution.

James Rowe



Video Bigger in Social Media in 2012

One of the key findings in the newly released 2012 Social Media Marketing industry Report from Michael Stelzner is three fourths of marketers plan to increase their use of YouTube and video.

Stelzner’s annual report also found YouTube has moved Facebook out of the first spot for marketers.

So here’s more evidence of the importance of video and developing workflows to manage the use of video.  Watch and listen as the author and blogger discusses his latest study.


 

There is, of course a lot more to glean from the report.  So read it here or download and share it.

James Rowe


A Single but Important NAB Discussion 2012
The topic should be flashing across the National Association of Broadcasters convention website.  I count several names on the speaker’s list for the annual Las Vegas event that will be talking about “standards” for the media industry; at some point between April 14th and 19th in the desert.  Standards are the perennial discussion for a gathering of media leaders and thinkers.
Look at the Advanced Media Workflow Association page to get a really good idea of this single but profound topic and what will be going on with the AMWA at Booth N617.  There should be very interesting talk about industry standards and technology interoperability.  If you think it sounds complex then consider what the subject portends for the industry standard movement.   Brad Gilmer’s document is where he writes for Gilmer and Associates on Tying It All Together.  The association’s Executive Director offers a solid overview of the effects of media standards.

I particularly favored a line in the Framework for Interoperable Media Services RFT that explains “respondents are invited to propose their vision of the decomposition of the media industry.”  What the AMWA indicates is desired is simply an agreed upon framework for a standard system of services to manage media ingest, transformation, and movement.
The amount of income to be generated, cost savings to be gained, improved efficiency, and demand to cover all of media production and distribution including YouTube is very relevant talk in the new marketplace.  The discussion goes to the management of business processes in the media and entertainment industry.  AMWA board member and PBS heavy Wendy Allen will be speaking at NAB this month.
Stay tuned because the standards parlay has been discussed at high levels at such conventions for years and other iterations of the standards issues can be claimed to have hatched a standard or two.  This talk has a generous upside because the AMWA has produced very smart chatter these days and their case is well presented.  Al Kovalick is also an NAB speaker and he wrote the book on Information Technology and video.  Kovalick asks “Do you hear that rushing sound?.”
James Rowe
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A Single but Important NAB Discussion 2012

The topic should be flashing across the National Association of Broadcasters convention website.  I count several names on the speaker’s list for the annual Las Vegas event that will be talking about “standards” for the media industry; at some point between April 14th and 19th in the desert.  Standards are the perennial discussion for a gathering of media leaders and thinkers.

Look at the Advanced Media Workflow Association page to get a really good idea of this single but profound topic and what will be going on with the AMWA at Booth N617.  There should be very interesting talk about industry standards and technology interoperability.  If you think it sounds complex then consider what the subject portends for the industry standard movement.   Brad Gilmer’s document is where he writes for Gilmer and Associates on Tying It All Together.  The association’s Executive Director offers a solid overview of the effects of media standards.

I particularly favored a line in the Framework for Interoperable Media Services RFT that explains “respondents are invited to propose their vision of the decomposition of the media industry.”  What the AMWA indicates is desired is simply an agreed upon framework for a standard system of services to manage media ingest, transformation, and movement.

The amount of income to be generated, cost savings to be gained, improved efficiency, and demand to cover all of media production and distribution including YouTube is very relevant talk in the new marketplace.  The discussion goes to the management of business processes in the media and entertainment industry.  AMWA board member and PBS heavy Wendy Allen will be speaking at NAB this month.

Stay tuned because the standards parlay has been discussed at high levels at such conventions for years and other iterations of the standards issues can be claimed to have hatched a standard or two.  This talk has a generous upside because the AMWA has produced very smart chatter these days and their case is well presented.  Al Kovalick is also an NAB speaker and he wrote the book on Information Technology and video.  Kovalick asks “Do you hear that rushing sound?.”

James Rowe

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#FB4BIZ

Wow I used a hashtag for a title.  This one is worth it.  Chris Luo, Head of Global SMB Marketing Facebook , teams up with HubSpot to guide businesses in the use of the new Facebook timeline.  The first webinar was attended by 20,000 people and it’s posted here.

Here’s the slidedeck to tease you started.



James Rowe

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Digital Technology and Boomers

The Pew Internet Project has a newly released presentation on Baby Boomers and their adoption of digital devices.  It’s filled with charts and information broadcasters and others require for business planning.

Lee Rainie, the director of PIP, delivered the message at the Silver Summit in Washington, DC this week.  Here’s the slide deck.

 Baby Boomers and Digital Technology



James Rowe

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New Media Innovation in News Presentation

Click on the title to read about an interesting case study.

I recommend broadcast news managers and journalists take a serious look at the work done by Made by Many for ITV TV.

It’s a work in progress which the news business has always been.

James Rowe

Embrace Your Frenemy

There is a “threat and a promise” for the news media according to the latest report from the Pew Center for Excellence in Journalism.  PEJ delivers their annual report “State of the News Media 2012.”  The report suggests there is a window of opportunity for traditional news media to grow revenues.

The sub title of this year’s report is “Digital: News Gains Audience but Loses Ground in Chase for Revenue.”  PEW researchers write two numbers lead the challenge and opportunity the digital world poses for the news industry.  The statistics are the growing number of social media users and increase in use of smartphones and tablet computers.

Mobile technologies are new ways audiences consume news and the extensive report suggests “they are also a new wave of new technology that news companies need to react to.”  However the research warns the “new wave” threatens to shift the landscape out from under media once again.  The writers contend there is still time to adapt, though.

 

There is indication a significant percentage of consumers are being driven to trusted news sites by social media. Social media is the “frenemy” of traditional media because social media takes content and revenue from trusted news brands.  However researchers advise news providers “there is no choice but to get to know the “frenemy.”

 

The report points out trusted news providers are where consumers are turning most and television is winning big in that respect. Television remains the most popular source for a few widely followed topics, particularly weather and traffic.”

 

The growth in the sale and adoption of smartphones and tablets is having a powerful impact on consumption of news.


 

The State of Mobile America
 
 

As the landscape becomes more challenging for traditional and trusted news brands so do the economics.  Turning digital dimes into analog dollars is a problem long acknowledged.  And PEJ offers “the rapid growth of mobile computing and social media will only make that transition more complex. “

The PEJ study is, as usual, extensive, and I would recommend reading at least the segments pertinent to your business and the entire report if you can find time in your schedule.   There is a lot of rich information and the more I read the more I learn and the more I see opportunity to reclaim earnings for broadcasters.

James Rowe

 

A New Storytelling Tool

Leave it to a weather service provider to deliver a new tool for better visual storytelling.

Broadcast Engineering reports five ABC owned and operated stations chose Accuweather’s Storyteller interactive touchscreen system for their news broadcasts.

Reminds me of the days, as a reporter in Chicago, when I would visit Steve Baskerville of WBBM just so I could get a gander at the latest toys.  The weather guys always had the state of the art and coolest utilities.  Now Accuweather’s Storyteller is taking presentation tools beyond the weather position and offers reporters and anchors a tool for interactive presentation.

I wonder how many stations will check out Storyteller for elections reporting this season. There are a number of videos on the Accuweather site to help you understand the reach of Storyteller.  BE writes ”it makes it easy to incorporate live HD and SD video, graphic images, movies, and Web and social media content into the presentation, especially for stories that are unfolding in real time.”

James Rowe


 

Radiodays Europe Gets Lowdown on US Mobile & Social Usage

Pew Internet and American Life Project’s Kristen Purcell delivers a presentation in Barcelona, Spain detailing the Pew Center’s research on the breakneck growth of mobile connectivity and social networking in the United States.
Radiodays is reported to be Europe’s largest radio conference with 700 attendees from 45 countries and the changing behavior of the “connected generation” is a prime topic this week.
Pew Internet writes mobile devices and social networks “represent a significant departure from traditional media consumption patterns.” PI even released is slide deck early and here it is.

The reality Purcell will present is information is woven into our lives, constantly available and enveloping us all. No doubt traditional media has a reaction so stand by as media evolves to meet the consumers who are now producers.


James Rowe